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Blood moon // 4.15.14 

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Fairy rings occupy a prominent place in European folklore as the location of gateways into elfin kingdoms, or places where elves gather and dance. According to the folklore, a fairy ring appears when a fairy, pixie, or elf appears. It will disappear without trace in less than five days, but if an observer waits for the elf to return to the ring, he or she may be able to capture it. They are soooooo beautiful!

fairy rings are usually caused by decaying organic matter, generally a tree stump. many types of fungi have symbiotic relationships with tree roots and mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of such fungus. So if a huge old tree was cut down, you’ll often find fairy rings. they can last for years and years as the earth  reabsorbs all the nutrients left behind by the beautiful tree.

sorry, didn’t mean to crush dreams - but i have a degree in horticulture and i was really excited when i first learned this.

maybe fairies and fungi are joining together to mourn the loss of the tree

xo

NO BUT FINDING OUT ABOUT WHY FAIRY RINGS EXIST IS ALSO REALLY COOL.

From a writer’s perspective, it’s even more interesting to find out why they exist on a horticultural level, because it opens up a whole realm of fictional possibilities. Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.

For example, doesn’t that just essentially make this a tree grave? And if folklore has taught us anything, it’s that “fairies” and other spirits usually occupy trees, or have them as their life force. And that’s to say nothing of the folklore of trees being spirits in and of themselves, or kitsunes that live in tree hollows, or dryads, etc., etc.. So, if it’s disrespectful or feels like a slight to step on human graves, wouldn’t that logic transfer to stepping inside the Fairy Circle, AKA, the tree’s grave? It’s essentially giving more fuel to the story, not detracting from it, in my humble opinion!

And this is yet another reason I love K — her perspectives are awesome.

Also because the ring is a grave, the death of the tree means the death of the dryad who occupied it. so the dryad spirit would, in death, be a gateway. its spirit joining this world and the Realm of Faerie.

Sure, fairy rings are cool and all, but can we talk about the bigger picture of this discussion?

I love this post because it shows that science can be really fascinating and wonderful and every bit as interesting as mythology; and it’s still possible to love and respect mythology and appreciate its place in culture without believing it’s literally true and invalidating the science :D

and it’s possible to love and respect science without believing it ends all creativity and wonder and discussion

this post just shot to be one of my favorites on tumblr and I’m not even that into fairy rings

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scienceisbeauty:

(Beautiful) internal structures of the aquatic animals. Top: tube-snout (Aulorhynchus flavidus).  Middle: butterfly ray (Gymnura crebripunctata). Bottom: scalyhead sculpin (Artedius harringtoni).

Credit: Adam Summers

Source: Amazing Pictures of See-Through Fish (National Geographic)

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Dewy eyed insects by Paulo Rodrigues 

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